improv hiring job candidates brilliant jerks

How To Avoid Hiring Your Company’s Next Brilliant Jerk

Regardless of size, maturity, or industry, businesses and organizations face one near-universal business challenge: finding and hiring the right people. Given that people run your business, interact with your customers, and generate the ideas and innovative solutions to help your business grow, hiring the right people is essential to short term and long term success.

We’ve heard it over and over again from hiring managers and business leaders—and experienced it ourselves—hiring the right people is a continual challenge. Here’s why: Continue reading How To Avoid Hiring Your Company’s Next Brilliant Jerk

minority owned business supplier diversity

Mindhatch Now Certified by National Minority Supplier Development Council

We are thrilled to announce that we have been officially certified by the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) as a Minority Business Enterprise (MBE)! NMSDC certifies minority-owned businesses and advances their opportunities to work with corporate members.

We look forward to continuing our partnerships with companies and organizations that value supplier diversity and support minority-owned businesses like Mindhatch.

If you know anyone passionate about supplier diversity and is looking for expertise in design thinking, organizational improv, or innovation facilitation, please encourage them to Contact Us!

Design Thinking: Practice & Measurement Essentials | Online | April 2

design thinking corporate training

Design Thinking: Practice & Measurement Essentials

Learn how to put design thinking into practice at your organization

Mindhatch Founder, Coonoor Behal, will instruct this live online training for O’Reilly Media on April 2, 10am – 1pm PST.

REGISTER NOW

Course Description:

Design thinking takes the designer’s approach to problem-solving and applies it to all contexts and types of problems; it’s an extremely powerful technique where design, making, and business overlap, and it’s not just for designers. Teams and organizations leverage this approach to create more meaningful products and services for both their users and the market at the rapid speed that modern technology demands. However, building a practice of design thinking takes time and considerable effort and often requires change to organizational culture. Continue reading Design Thinking: Practice & Measurement Essentials | Online | April 2

Improv Psychological Safety

Psychological Safety in the Workplace: Why Improv Can Help

Many companies say they want their people to take more risks. How often have you heard “Let’s be more innovative!” or “Be a leader!” in the conference room? The trouble is that the cultures of most organizations don’t provide enough psychological safety to encourage these worthy goals. The predictable result is that team members stick to the “safe” behaviors that have always been encouraged, with at least one eye always on the next performance review.

Creating a culture where people are willing to “dare to fail” can be challenging. But we see smart companies do it all the time by leveraging improv in the workplace. In fact, a lot of the skills and mindsets improv performers use are surprisingly effective for building high-performance teams.

Before you read further, a quick disclaimer. When I talk about improv here, I’m not suggesting that teams are acting or performing comedy routines in our workshops, though we do tend to laugh a lot. Continue reading Psychological Safety in the Workplace: Why Improv Can Help

design thinking organizational culture

Design Thinking: A Key To Improving Organizational Culture

In our work facilitating corporate training workshops on design thinking and executing human-centered design research and strategy projects for clients, we’ve noticed a perspective-shifting trend. Most, if not all, of our clients think they want their teams to learn design thinking to improve execution and results from problem solving. They believe that incorporating human-centered design methods and tools into their work is entirely tactical. Their goal is to build a better product or service, increase revenue, or provide their staff with valuable training.

However, no matter how pragmatic the original motivation for exploring design thinking, we quickly learn what the client (and organization) really needs and wants: a change in organizational culture. Continue reading Design Thinking: A Key To Improving Organizational Culture